Miss New York Has Everything

Her aunt was a nun who popped pills and did time in Narcotics Anonymous. Her father grew up during the Depression, believed he'd be the next Frank Sinatra, and ended up working in the mills. His daughter, Lori Jakiela, spent her suburban Pittsburgh childhood watching Marlo Thomas in That Girl and dreaming of New York City. Instead, she got bad talent shows, a Junior Miss contest, and college in Erie, PA, where the big attraction was chicken wings. But years later, her Big Apple dreams were still going strong. With her twenties becoming a distant memory, Jakiela answered an airline ad promising a NYC home base, high-flying glamour, and three-day layovers in Paris. The reality was a roach-filled apartment in Queens, a polyester uniform cut like a sack, and a life that wasn't quite what she imagined.

BOOKS AND BLURBS

"Adoptees look out at the world from the eyes of what was lost. We can't help it, but we can transform it. Lori Jakiela's new memoir -- Belief Is Its Own Kind of Truth, Maybe -- is a beautifully written journey into one woman's process of letting go of what was lost, and the messy dignity of human transformation. Her story is one of life, of reaching for life. With a deep gift for storytelling and unsparing, beautifully gritty self-examination, she brings the reader on the harrowing journey with her. It's an important ride, and an important book." singer-songwriter Mary Gauthier
Memoir
"Lori Jakiela's painfully funny memoir is so good you'll wonder why the author isn't the literary toast of the entire country by now."
--The Pittsburgh Post Gazette
"A marvel of a memoir... brims with both small-town heart and big-city sophistication."
--Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
Poems
"Jakiela's poems read like factory guys doing shots after the foreman's funeral. Powerful, delicate, funny and goddamn great."--Serge Bielanko, MARAH

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